Priority Legislation

AB 1576 (Asm. Marc Levine (D)):
Modeling Agencies: Licensure: Models: Employees: SUPPORT

*NEW LANGUAGE: GUT & AMEND FROM PREVIOUS BILL WE ENDORSED*
This was the Gender Discrimination: Pricing Goods Bill we supported in October 2017, that language was abandoned and removed from the bill, below is the new bill language.

This bill would require a person engaging in the occupation of a modeling agency to be licensed by the
Labor Commissioner under the licensing provisions that apply to talent agencies. It would also, require all employees who work with artists and all artists represented by a licensee, within 30 days of being hired, to receive sexual harassment prevention and health standards training in a manner approved by the Labor Commissioner, and once per calendar year thereafter. Further it would, require the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board to, no later than June 30, 2019, and in consultation with accredited specialists in the prevention and treatment of eating disorders, adopt an occupational safety and health standard for models.

AB 1734 (Asm. Ian Calderon (D)):
Income Taxes: Credits: Motion Pictures: SUPPORT

This bill would establish similar credits under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2020, to be allocated by the California Film Commission on or after July 1, 2020, and before July 1, 2025, except as provided. This bill would allow a credit in an amount equal to 20% or 25% of qualified expenditures up to $100,000,000, for the production of a qualified motion picture in this state, with additional credit amounts allowed, including for amounts equal to specified qualified expenditures and qualified wages relating to original photography outside the Los Angeles zone, as specified. This bill would limit the aggregate amount of these new credits to be allocated in each fiscal year to $330 million plus the amount of any unused credit amounts for preceding fiscal years and attributable to existing motion picture credits, as specified. The bill, subject to a computation and ranking of applicants based on the jobs ratio, as defined, would require the California Film Commission to allocate credit amounts subject to specified categories of qualified motion pictures in 2 or more allocation periods per fiscal year beginning on or after July 1, 2020, and issue credit certificates. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy.

Motion Picture Industry – Film Tax Credits Extension
Consistent with LACDP’s previous position in 2014 supporting the Film Tax Credits, the committee is recommending SUPPORT for the following four bills. One of the following four will ultimately pass as the extension of the previous bill (AB 1839: Bocanegra – which began July 1, 2015 and ends June 30, 2020):

AB 1937 (Asm. Miguel Santiago (D)):
Public Employment: Payroll Deductions: SUPPORT

This bill clarifies existing statutes affecting public employers with regard to payroll deduction to standardize processes and requirements for both employers and employee organizations. Specifically, the bill would reaffirm the duty of public employers to engage in payroll deductions when employees and their employee organizations request them. Nothing in this bill is a departure from current law and it is consistent with the basic philosophy and structure of collective bargaining statues and policies in California. With the impending Supreme Court decision on Janus vs. AFSCME, public unions can likely anticipate anti-union employers move to end the current system of payroll deductions as a way of completely fracturing the unions and making it practically impossible for unions to collect dues & other fees. This bill removes any ambiguity in California law with regard to the obligation of a public employer to engage in payroll deduction of employee-authorized union dues and fees.

AB 2108 (Asm. Kevin McCarty (D)):
Youth Athletics: Safe Youth Football Act: SUPPORT

This bill, on and after January 1, 2020, would prohibit any person who is not at least 12 years of age from playing tackle football with a youth sports organization.

AB 2338 (Asm. Marc Levine (D)):
Talent Agencies: Training: SUPPORT

This bill would require a talent agency to provide training and educational materials, where applicable, on sexual harassment prevention, retaliation, nutrition, and eating disorders to its employees and artists, would require those training and educational materials to be in a language the employee or artist understands, and would require the licensee, as part of the application for license renewal, to confirm with the commissioner that it has and will continue to provide the relevant training and educational materials. Additionally, it would require the commissioner, prior to the issuance of a permit to employ a minor in the entertainment industry, to provide the minor and the minor’s parent or legal guardian with training in sexual harassment prevention, retaliation, reporting resources, nutrition, and eating disorders. The bill would further require a talent agency to request and retain a copy of the minor’s entertainment work permit prior to representing or sending a minor artist on an audition, meeting, or interview for engagement of the minor’s services. Lastly, it would make it a violation of existing laws for a talent agency to fail to comply with the bill’s training, education, and permit retention requirements and would authorize the commissioner to assess civil penalties of $100 for each violation.

AB 2408 (Asm. Shirley Weber (D)):
California State University: Ethnic Studies: SUPPORT

This bill, commencing with the 2019–20 academic year, would require the California State University (CSU) to provide for courses in ethnic studies, including, issues of race and gender and sexual identity, at each of its campuses. The bill, commencing with the 2019–20 academic year, would require the CSU to require, as a graduation requirement, the completion of one 3-unit course in ethnic studies consistent with the requirements and exceptions provided in the current existing regulations.

AB 2505 (Asm. Miguel Santiago (D)):
CSU: Budget Oversight Policies: SUPPORT

This bill would require the Office of the Chancellor of the California State University (CSU) to require each CSU campus to develop and implement budget oversight policies, as specified. The bill would require each campus to, on or before Jan. 15, 2019, submit to the chancellor’s office a summary report of its expenditures of state appropriations received for the 2017–18 academic year. The bill would require the chancellor’s office to, on or before Mar. 31, 2019, submit a statewide report to the Legislature and the Department of Finance based on these campus reports. The bill would require the California State Auditor to, (1) on or before Dec. 30, 2022, and every 3 years thereafter, audit the CSU’s budget for the fiscal year preceding each audit, as specified, and (2) report the findings of each audit conducted pursuant to the bill’s provisions to the chairs of the Assembly and Senate budget committees and to the appropriate budget subcommittee chairs that oversee state funding of the CSU on or before Mar. 31 of the year following the fiscal year that is the subject of the audit.

AB 2936 (Asm. Adrin Nazarian (D)):
Income Taxes: Credits: Motion Pictures: SUPPORT

This bill would allow and extend the allocation of the current credits through and including the 2024–25 fiscal year. The bill would require the commission to allocate those credits before July 1, 2025, as specified.
This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy.

AB 2943 (Asm. Evan Low (D)):
Unlawful Business Practices: Sexual Orientation Change Efforts: SUPPORT

This bill would include, as an unlawful practice prohibited under the Consumer Legal Remedies Act, advertising, offering to engage in, or engaging in sexual orientation change efforts with an individual. The bill would also declare the intent of the Legislature in this regard.

SB 224 (Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D)): Personal Rights: Sexual Harassment: SUPPORT

This bill adds “investor, elected official, lobbyist, director, and producer” to the current list of examples of relationships that are covered by Civil Code Section 51.9’s imposition of civil liability for sexual harassment in business, service, or professional contexts. Because the current list of examples is not exclusive, this bill is declaratory of existing law. Nonetheless, the express inclusion of these relationships may serve the purpose of highlighting and providing additional notice to people in these roles that they can be sued for engaging in sexual harassment of those over whom they wield so much power and influence.

SB 463 (Sen. Ricardo Lara (D)):
State Capitol Park: California Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Civil Rights Monument: SUPPORT
{GUT & AMEND: we took a previous position of SUPPORT on this bill which dealt with English Learners: Reclassification. As of May 2018, the bill has been significantly altered. The committee reviewed the new language, we reconsidered the bill and we have REAFFIRMED our SUPPORT for SB 463 with its new language}.

This bill would authorize the California Legislative LGBT Caucus Foundation, in consultation with the California Legislative LGBT Caucus and the department, to plan and undertake construction of a monument honoring California’s LGBT movement’s civil rights history within the State Capitol Park. The bill would require the California Legislative LGBT Caucus Foundation and the California Legislative LGBT Caucus, if they undertake responsibility to construct a monument pursuant to these provisions, to establish a schedule for the design, construction, and dedication of the monument. The bill would require the department to meet specified goals. The bill would also require the planning, construction, and maintenance of the monument to be funded exclusively through private donations.

SB 827 (Sen. Scott Wiener (D)):
Planning And Zoning: Transit-Rich Housing Bonus: OPPOSE

This bill would require a local government to, if requested, grant the developer of a transit-rich housing project a transit-rich housing bonus if the development meets specified planning standards including complying with demolition permit requirements, local inclusionary housing ordinance requirements, preparing a relocation benefits and assistance plan, any locally adopted objective zoning standards, and any locally adopted minimum unit mix requirements. The bill would define a transit-rich housing project as a residential development project the parcels of which are all within a 1/2 mile radius of a major transit stop or a 1/4 mile radius of a stop on a high-quality transit corridor. The bill would exempt an eligible applicant who receives a transit-rich housing bonus from various requirements, including maximum controls on residential density, maximum controls on floor area ratio that are lower than a specified amount, minimum automobile parking requirements, maximum height limitations, and zoning or design controls that have the effect of limiting additions onto existing structures or lots that comply with those maximum floor area ratios and height limitations. The bill would require an eligible applicant who receives a transit-rich housing bonus to provide benefits to eligible displaced persons who are displaced by the development, including requiring the applicant to offer a right to remain guarantee to those tenants, and to make payments to eligible displaced persons for moving and related expenses as well as for relocation benefits. The bill would also require an eligible applicant to submit a relocation benefit and assistance plan for approval to the applicable local government to that effect, and to provide specified information and assistance to eligible displaced persons.

SB 822 (Sen. Scott Wiener (D)):
Broadband Internet Access Service: SUPPORT

CA Net Neutrality Bill: This bill would revise the act to prohibit specified actions by an Internet service provider (ISP), as defined, that provides broadband Internet access service, as specified. The bill would prohibit an ISP from offering different levels of quality of service to end users as part of broadband Internet access service unless specified conditions are met. The bill would authorize the Attorney General, upon his or her own motion or upon complaint, to investigate and bring an action to enforce those prohibitions and would require that complaints be reviewed by the Attorney General on a case-by-case basis. The bill would additionally make the consumer remedies and procedures of the act applicable to enforce those prohibitions. This bill would prohibit a public entity, as defined, from purchasing, or providing funding for the purchase of, any fixed or mobile broadband Internet access services that violate these prohibitions. The bill would require an ISP that provides fixed or mobile broadband Internet access service purchased or funded by a public entity to publicly disclose accurate information regarding the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of its broadband Internet access service that is sufficient to enable end users of those purchased or funded services, including a public entity, to fully and accurately ascertain if the service violates these prohibitions.

SB 832 (Sen. Anthony Portantino (D):
Income Taxes: Credits: Motion Pictures: SUPPORT
This bill would allow and extend the allocation of those credits through and including the 2023–24 fiscal year. The bill would require the commission to allocate those credits before July 1, 2024, as specified.
This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy.

SB 834 (Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D)):
State Lands: Leasing: Oil & GAS: SUPPORT

This bill bars the State Lands Commission from both entering into new leases for new oil- and gas-related construction; and renewing, modifying or extending an existing lease for any activity that would facilitate new or additional exploration, development, or production of oil and gas, in state tide and submerged lands to support new offshore oil and gas leases in federal waters, subject to the current existing exceptions to the California Coastal Sanctuary Act (such as repair and maintenance of pipelines and other infrastructure to ensure safe operation, as specified). The same restrictions apply to local trustees of granted state tide and submerged lands.

SB 951 (Sen. Holly Mitchell (D)):
Income Taxes: Credits: Motion Pictures: SUPPORT

This bill would establish similar credits under the Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2020, to be allocated by the California Film Commission on or after July 1, 2020, and before July 1, 2025, except as provided. This bill would allow a credit in an amount equal to 20% or 25% of qualified expenditures up to $100,000,000, for the production of a qualified motion picture in this state, with additional credit amounts allowed, including for amounts equal to specified qualified expenditures and qualified wages relating to original photography outside the Los Angeles zone, as specified. This bill would limit the aggregate amount of these new credits to be allocated in each fiscal year to $330 million plus the amount of any unused credit amounts for preceding fiscal years and attributable to existing motion picture credits, as specified. The bill, subject to a computation and ranking of applicants based on the jobs ratio, as defined, would require the California Film Commission to allocate credit amounts subject to specified categories of qualified motion pictures in 2 or more allocation periods per fiscal year beginning on or after July 1, 2020, and issue credit certificates. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy.

SB 968 (Sen. Richard Pan (D)):
Postsecondary Education: Mental Health Counselors: SUPPORT

This bill would require the Trustees of the California State University (CSU), and the governing board of each community college district, and request the Regents of the University of California, to have one full-time equivalent mental health counselor per 1,000 students enrolled at each of their respective campuses to the fullest extent consistent with state and federal law. The bill would define mental health counselor for purposes of this provision. The bill would require those institutions, on or before January 1, 2020, and every 3 years thereafter, to report to the Legislature how funding was spent and the number of mental health counselors employed on each of its campuses. The bill would require each campus of those institutions to, at least every 3 years, conduct a campus survey and focus groups to understand student needs and challenges regarding, among other things, their mental health, would require each campus of those institutions to collect data on attempted suicides, and would require that data, without any personally identifiable information, to be included in the report to the Legislature. To the extent that these provisions would impose new duties on community college districts, it would constitute a state-mandated local program.

SB 1300 (Sen. Hanna-Beth Jackson (D)):
Unlawful Employment Practices: Discrimination And Harassment: SUPPORT

This bill requires that all employees receive sexual harassment training and education; includes bystander intervention training as a part of the training; and prohibits a release of claims or nondisparagement agreement between employers and employees under specified circumstances. Broadly speaking, the bill touches on four areas: the severe or pervasive standard for sexual harassment claims, sexual harassment training and education for employees, disparagement agreements and releases of claims, and burden of proof on plaintiffs when alleging that an employer did not take the necessary steps to prevent harassment and discrimination in the workplace.

SB 1421 (Sen. Nancy Skinner (D)):
Peace Officers: Release Of Records: SUPPORT

This bill would require, notwithstanding any other law, certain peace officer or custodial officer personnel records and records relating to specified incidents, complaints, and investigations involving peace officers and custodial officers to be made available for public inspection pursuant to the California Public Records Act. The bill would provide that this information includes, but is not limited to, the framing allegation or complaint, any facts or evidence collected or considered, and any findings or recommended findings, discipline, or corrective action taken. The bill would require records disclosed pursuant to this provision to be redacted only to remove personal data or information, such as a home address, telephone number, or identities of family members, other than the names and work-related information of peace officers and custodial officers, to preserve the anonymity of complainants and witnesses, or to protect confidential medical, financial, or other information in which disclosure would cause an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy that clearly outweighs the strong public interest in records about misconduct by peace officers and custodial officers, or where there is a specific, particularized reason to believe that disclosure would pose a significant danger to the physical safety of the peace officer, custodial officer, or others. The bill would allow the delay of disclosure, as specified, for records relating to an open investigation or court proceeding, subject to certain limitations.

H.R. 1437 (Rep. Ted Lieu (D) [CA-33]):
No Money Bail Act of 2017: SUPPORT

This bill amends the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to make ineligible for funding under the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program (a.k.a. the leading source of federal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions) a state with a bail system that uses payment of money as a condition of pretrial release in criminal cases. The Department of Justice must reallocate such state’s JAG funding among eligible states. Additionally, the bill prohibits payment of money as a condition of pretrial release in any federal criminal case.

H.R. 2119 / S. 928 (Rep. Ted Lieu (D) [CA-33] / Sen. Patty Murray (D) [WA]):
Therapeutic Fraud Prevention Act of 2017: SUPPORT 

This bill prohibits sexual orientation or gender identity conversion therapy from being provided in exchange for monetary compensation. It bars advertisements for such therapy that claim to: (1) change an individual’s sexual orientation or gender identity, (2) eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward individuals of the same gender, or (3) be harmless or without risk.  Individuals or entities shall not assist or facilitate a conversion therapy if they receive monetary compensation from any source in connection with providing such therapies.  These prohibitions are inapplicable to practices or treatments that do not seek to change sexual orientation or gender identity if they provide: (1) assistance to an individual undergoing a gender transition; or (2) acceptance, support, and understanding of clients or facilitation of clients’ coping, social support, and identity exploration and development, including sexual orientation-neutral interventions to prevent or address unlawful conduct or unsafe sexual practices.  The Federal Trade Commission and states are provided authority to enforce against violations.

H.R. 3775 / S. 1720 (Rep. Lamar Smith (R) [TX-21] / Sen. Tom Cotton (R) [AR]):Immigration in the National Interest Act of 2017 / RAISE Act: OPPOSE

These are identical companion bills to S. 354, which LACDP formally “Opposed” September 12, 2017. The efforts behind that bill have subsided and these bills are essentially identical to S. 354.  All three bills seek to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to establish a skills-based immigration points system, to focus family-sponsored immigration on spouses and minor children.  All three also eliminate the Diversity Visa Program, and set a limit on the number of refugees admitted annually to the United States.  There are a few negligible differences between them, in terms of point requirements, but essentially they are the same.

H.R. 4760 (Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R) [VA-06]):
Securing America’s Future Act of 2018: OPPOSE 

This bill amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to revise immigrant visa allocation provisions, including family-related visas. A nonimmigrant classification for parents of adult U.S. citizens is created.

The diversity visa program is eliminated.  Annual immigration levels are reduced by about 25%.  The limit on the worldwide level of employment-based immigrants is increased.  The H-2C visa temporary agricultural worker program is revised. A trust fund is established to provide incentives for such workers to return to their country of origin.  DNA testing to establish family relationships is authorized.  Employment eligibility verification provisions are revised. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) shall establish an employment verification system.  No federal, state, or local government entity or individual may prohibit or restrict a federal, state, or local government entity or official from complying with the immigration laws or assisting related federal law enforcement activities.  The bill revises provisions regarding: (1) detention of aliens in removal proceedings; (2) illegal entry and reentry; (3) inadmissibility and deportability of criminal aliens, gang members, drunk drivers, and sex offenders; (4) repatriation; (5) asylum and asylum fraud; (6) unaccompanied alien children; (7) foreign students; and (8) visa fraud.  The bill: (1) transfers authority for strengthening the southern border from the Department of Justice to DHS; (2) revises border security provisions; (3) provides for additional border security personnel; (4) authorizes new ports of entry along the northern border and southern borders; (5) authorizes National Guard border security activities; (6) provides contingent nonimmigrant status for certain aliens who entered the United States as minors; (7) authorizes appropriations for specified border barriers and infrastructure; and (8) establishes Operation Stonegarden to make border security grants to law enforcement agencies.  DHS shall: (1) submit a southern border threat analysis, (2) establish the Integrated Border Enforcement Team program, (3) implement the Border Security Deployment Program, (4) review social media activities of visa applicants, and (5) establish a biometric exit data system.

H.R. 5087 / S. 2095 (Rep. David Cicilline (D) [RI-01] / Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) [CA]):
Assault Weapons Ban of 2018 / Assault Weapons Ban of 2017: SUPPORT

This bill amends the federal criminal code to make it a crime to knowingly import, sell, manufacture, transfer, or possess a semiautomatic assault weapon (SAW) or large capacity ammunition feeding device (LCAFD).

The prohibition does not apply to a firearm that is: (1) manually operated by bolt, pump, lever, or slide action; (2) permanently inoperable; (3) an antique; or (4) a rifle or shotgun specifically identified by make and model.

Additionally, the bill does not prohibit, with respect to a SAW or LCAFD:
– importation, sale, manufacture, transfer, or possession related to certain law enforcement efforts, or authorized tests or experiments;
– importation, sale, transfer, or possession related to securing nuclear materials; and
– possession by a retired law enforcement officer.

The bill permits continued possession, sale, or transfer of a grandfathered SAW, which must be securely stored. A licensed gun dealer must conduct a background check prior to the sale or transfer of a grandfathered SAW between private parties.

The bill permits continued possession of, but prohibits sale or transfer of, a grandfathered LCAFD.

Newly manufactured LCAFDs must display serial number identification. Newly manufactured SAWs and LCAFDs must display the date of manufacture.

The legislation amends the NICS Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 to require law enforcement agencies to be notified when a prohibited person attempts to purchase a grandfathered SAW.

It also amends the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to allow a state or local government to use Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program funds to compensate individuals who surrender a SAW or LCAFD under a buy-back program.

S 733 (Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) [AK]):
Sportsmen’s Act: OPPOSE 

This bill requires the Bureau of Land Management [BLM] and the United States Forestry Service [USFS] lands to be open for recreational hunting, fishing, and shooting unless specifically closed; facilitating the construction and expansion of public target ranges; including ranges on Federal land managed by the USFS and BLM; authorizing the lawful transportation of bows and crossbows through National Parks; and allowing the Secretary of the Interior to use qualified volunteers from the hunting community to help cull wildlife on NPS land.

S 2849 (Sen. Kamala Harris (D) [CA]):
DONE (Detention Oversight, Not Expansion) Act: SUPPORT

This bill is to prohibit the expansion of immigration detention facilities, to improve the oversight of such facilities, and for other purposes.

Previously Endorsed Legislation

2016 Priority Legislation

2015 Priority Legislation

2014 Priority Legislation

2013 Priority Legislation

2010 Priority Legislation

2008 Priority Legislation

2007 Priority Legislation

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